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From the Gonzo

. . . somewhere near the event horizon.

Wednesday, February 01, 2006

Violating invisible lines

The story about the Mexican military violating U.S. borders rampantly, which I first referenced here, (more information here) has gotten some pretty hefty coverage by the Associated Press in the last week.

This story from Jan. 28 is interesting because it looks like our government is trying to relay the message that, "yes, this was a Mexican military incursion." I suppose there are a number of reasons why they might want it to look this way.

The best journalism, I have seen so far anyway, on this issue has come from the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin in Ontario, California.

This story about an armed standoff between Mexican "military" and U.S. border agents peaked my interest and a Jan. 15 (which was taken offline for some reason, a story from KYMA TV on MSNBCs Web site talks about it here) helped spur several Congressional reps to call for investigation into the border incursions referenced in the Jan. 15 Daily Bulletin story.

This whole thing is whimsical. These guys were running drugs, whether they were Mexican military or not, it doesn't really matter. Saying that the Mexican military participating in drug running means that the entire Mexican government sanctions drug running is a bit of a stretch.

Regardless, with the border, control is impossible. It's truly a needle in a haystack battle. People get away with smuggling of all sorts everyday, in airports, at border check points, in train stations, on highways. So why wouldn't people try to get away with smuggling across the vast expanses of open land on the Mexico-U.S. border, seems natural enough and probably less risky from a potential incarceration standpoint.

But I'm sure the terrorism card will be played. And it's hard to sort through the heaps of propaganda both sides give out.

So who can you trust?

Is there really a serious security risk at the southern U.S. border? Or is it all just trumped up nonsense to keep the drones toiling away?

I watched a documentary on National Geographic last year. It told the story of a team of Navy SEALS sent across the Mexican border to dispose of a rogue chemical warfare scientist who had set up camp with some jihadist agents. The story, as told, played out in the Summer of 2004 and the SEALS found live chem/bio warfare agents on site.

Okay. Maybe that happened, maybe it didn't. It would be an easy enough story to fake, documents and all (the military documents everything, good journalists usually know that and thusly the military knows that reporters know this).

While information control doesn't necessarily ensure a firm grasp on power it goes a long way toward meeting that end.

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